Great Barrier Reef Region Guide

Click Images to view gallery for this subject

CLOWNFISH
CLOWNFISH
CLOWNFISH & ANEMOME LIVE IN MUTUAL RELATIONSHIP
CLOWNFISH & ANEMOME LIVE IN MUTUAL RELATIONSHIP
PHOTO COURTESY OF BRETT GOODBAN
PHOTO COURTESY OF BRETT GOODBAN
IN SEARCH OF NEMO!
IN SEARCH OF NEMO!

Clown Fish

Updated: 03-Mar-2014


Did you know that clown fish are one of the only fish that can live in sea anemones without being stung by the tentacles of the anemone?

Clown fish live in a mutual relationship with sea anemones.

The anemone protects the clown fish because reef life is dangerous for small, brightly coloured fish with very poor swimming abilities. The anemone's tentacles kill other fish that touch them, but the clown fish seems to be immune to its poison.

The anemone protects the clown fish from most predators, who know not to go near the anemone's tentacles. 


Clown fish and damsel fish are the only species of fish which can avoid the potent stings of an anemone. For this reason, clown fish never stray far from their host.

In turn clown fish help to protect the anemone by chasing away polyp-eating fish such as the butterfly fish. The colorful fish also clean the anemone by eating the algae and food leftovers on the anemone. This is known as a symbiotic (or living together) association.

Clown fish live in their anemone in groups. Usually a female lives with other males. When the female dies the head male changes sex and becomes the female.

The movie 'Finding Nemo'  created quite a demand for home aquariums. The bad news is that the clown fish require anemone and not all anemone are suited for home aquariums.

It is best that Nemo and his friends remain in their natural habitat, where they belong.

Edit This Page

Edit Page Content

Post Comment